People argue that 2020 is not the appropriate year to clone a bird whose species went extinct 700 years ago after archaeologists discovered its 3,300-year-old claw.

   

Even to this day, there are so many things we still don’t know about our beautiful planet and its history. And maybe that’s the reason, why every little detail scientists and archaeologists manage to discover feels extremely exciting to hear about.

Three decades ago, a team of archaeologists were exploring a cave system on Mount Owen in New Zealand when they came across a breathtaking find. The thing they discovered was a perfectly preserved dinosaur-like claw that still had flesh and muscles attached to it

Here’s a photo capturing the famous claw

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

Later it turned out that this mysterious leg was 3,300-year-old and it belonged to an extinct bird called moa which disappeared from the Earth approximately 700 to 800 years ago.

Here’s how this bird had probably looked like

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

Turns out, moa first appeared around 8.5 million years ago! Apparently, back in the day, there were at least 10 species of moa. The two largest species reached about 12 feet (3.6 m) in height with neck outstretched and weighed about 510 lb (230 kg) while the smallest was around the size of a turkey.

Here’s a picture showing a size comparison between four moa species and a human

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

These now-extinct birds were flightless and lived in New Zealand

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

For a long time, scientists have been trying to find an answer to the question, why these birds went extinct. Here’s a thing—moa disappeared from our Earth around 700 years ago, shortly after humans arrived on the islands. Some scientists believe that it wasn’t a coincidence.

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

An evolutionary biologist Trevor Worthy suggests this: “The inescapable conclusion is these birds were not senescent, not in the old age of their lineage and about to exit from the world. Rather they were robust, healthy populations when humans encountered and terminated them.”

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

Here’s what people are saying about this find

 

Related Posts

Uncovered Egyptian mummies from coffins inspire dread of the “Curse of the Pharaohs”

THE COFFINS of high-status ancient Egyptian Sennedjem and one of his wives have been cracked open at a museum in Egypt. The sarcophagi were unpacked in the…

The Ptolemaic Dynasty was the final Egyptian dynasty.

Pt𝚘l𝚎m𝚊ic E𝚐𝚢𝚙t is 𝚍istinctiv𝚎 in 𝚋𝚎in𝚐 𝚋𝚘th th𝚎 l𝚊st in𝚍𝚎𝚙𝚎n𝚍𝚎nt E𝚐𝚢𝚙ti𝚊n 𝚍𝚢n𝚊st𝚢 𝚊n𝚍 th𝚎 l𝚊st H𝚎ll𝚎nistic kin𝚐𝚍𝚘m t𝚘 𝚏𝚊ll t𝚘 R𝚘m𝚎. Th𝚎 Pt𝚘l𝚎mi𝚎s w𝚎𝚛𝚎 n𝚘t n𝚊tiv𝚎 E𝚐𝚢𝚙ti𝚊ns,…

Tutankhamun’s Twin Tragedy: The Death of a Dynasty

T𝚘ss𝚎𝚍 𝚊w𝚊𝚢 c𝚊ll𝚘𝚞sl𝚢 in 𝚊 𝚍𝚊𝚛k c𝚘𝚛n𝚎𝚛 𝚘𝚏 th𝚎 l𝚊vish T𝚛𝚎𝚊s𝚞𝚛𝚢 in th𝚎 s𝚞𝚋t𝚎𝚛𝚛𝚊n𝚎𝚊n t𝚘m𝚋 𝚘𝚏 T𝚞t𝚊nkh𝚊m𝚞n w𝚊s 𝚙𝚘ssi𝚋l𝚢 th𝚎 m𝚘st 𝚙𝚘i𝚐n𝚊nt 𝚛𝚎mn𝚊nt 𝚘𝚏 th𝚎 𝚋𝚘𝚢 kin𝚐’s…

Unearthed: 60,000 Skeletons Buried in a Green Area of London. Details below in the comments section

A mammoth dig is oпgoiпg that is expected to Uпearth 60,000 skeletoпs from a Loпdoп cemetery that is 230 years old. To date, 1,200 people’s boпes have…

Ancient underwater discoveries have revealed the Pharaonic origins of the Ptolemaic City

Al𝚎x𝚊n𝚍𝚛i𝚊, l𝚘c𝚊t𝚎𝚍 𝚘n th𝚎 M𝚎𝚍it𝚎𝚛𝚛𝚊n𝚎𝚊n c𝚘𝚊st in E𝚐𝚢𝚙t, h𝚊s s𝚎𝚎n m𝚊n𝚢 ch𝚊n𝚐𝚎s in its 2,300 𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛 hist𝚘𝚛𝚢. F𝚘𝚞n𝚍𝚎𝚍 𝚋𝚢 Al𝚎x𝚊n𝚍𝚎𝚛 th𝚎 G𝚛𝚎𝚊t in 331 B.C., 𝚊t its…

The Grand Egyptian Museum is celebrating Tutankhamun’s 5,000 treasures as part of an event honoring Egypt’s Renaissance.

In th𝚎 h𝚎𝚊𝚛t 𝚘𝚏 E𝚐𝚢𝚙t, 𝚊 m𝚘n𝚞m𝚎nt𝚊l t𝚛i𝚋𝚞t𝚎 t𝚘 hist𝚘𝚛𝚢 𝚊n𝚍 h𝚎𝚛it𝚊𝚐𝚎 is 𝚞n𝚍𝚎𝚛w𝚊𝚢 𝚊s th𝚎 G𝚛𝚊n𝚍 E𝚐𝚢𝚙ti𝚊n M𝚞s𝚎𝚞m t𝚊k𝚎s sh𝚊𝚙𝚎, 𝚙𝚛𝚘misin𝚐 t𝚘 sh𝚘wc𝚊s𝚎 th𝚎 𝚍𝚊zzlin𝚐 l𝚎𝚐𝚊c𝚢…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *